Waterstone’s Children’s Book Prize 2021

Inspire your little ones and spark their imaginations with these top pics from the expert team at Waterstones.

Open daily with a wonderful selection of books for readers of all ages and interests, you can find Waterstones on the lower level of the shopping centre.

Kind of Spark

‘A Kind Of Spark was inspired by the history of Scottish witch trials, and the tenacity and fortitude of neurodivergent children. I wanted to write a funny, warm and empowering book for young girls and ND children.’ – Elle McNicoll

A Kind of Spark tells the story of 11-year-old Addie as she campaigns for a memorial in memory of the witch trials that took place in her Scottish hometown. Addie knows there’s more to the story of these ‘witches’, just like there is more to hers. Can Addie challenge how the people in her town see her, and make her voice heard?

Grumpy Fairies

Between the fairies’ comical expressions and the plot’s light-hearted sense of peril, Bethan’s marriage of text and illustration crafts an entertaining tale. The Grumpy Fairies is a book that children gleefully request on repeat.

On winning the category, Bethan said:

‘I’m so thrilled that The Grumpy Fairies has won the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize Illustrated Book category, I can’t quite believe it’s true! It has been such a privilege to have been included on the shortlist with so many other talented authors and illustrators and it means so much to me that more readers will get to enjoy the antics of the grumpy fairies as a result of the award.’

Wranglestone

Darren’s post-apocalyptic narrative balances a cinematic state of impending-doom with unending hope, courage and love. Standing out in its genre for all the right reasons, it’s impossible to put this perfectly-paced and nerve-tingling horror down. Suitable for 13+.

On winning the category, Darren said:

‘Because Wranglestone has been chosen by a range of booksellers from across the UK, I hope this win proves that there is a readiness in readers for the LGBTQ+ experience to expand into genres still dominated by their heterosexual counterparts, and this causes publishers to make bolder choices in the books they decide children and teenagers should read. But ultimately, this is a win for LGBTQ+ teenagers by showing you that your story can be for the many and not just the few. I am so touched and so very grateful that my two boys ever found such an open-hearted tribe to champion them.’

Find out more about the winner or read recommendations on other books of the Waterstones website here